How I went from Heavy Daily Drinking to “By The Book” Moderation in Four Months.

  No classic “rock bottom” experience brought me to Moderation Management in June of 2020. A heavy daily drinker for two decades or more, I overdid it during the pandemic. […]

Yahoo Life Article: What Does It Mean To Be Sober-Curious?

Moderation Management’s Heather M.  and other experts in the recovery field weigh in on the sober-curious movement: “For Heather Molnar, a member of the operations team at Moderation Management, which […]

Tool Tuesday Post 1: 9 Classic MM Tools!

Happy moderation #tooltuesday !!!   Today, we’ve gathered all the tools we’ve posted thus far and put them in one handy dandy toolbox for ya! 1. The Buddy Up Tool: […]

SELF Article: 6 Ways To Set Boundaries and Drink Less Right Now

In SELF’s article, writer, Natasha Lavender, interviews several women who share their ideas and strategies for setting boundaries to control their drinking and to get others to respect those boundaries. […]

Review of Forbes Article Featuring 16 Expert Tips To Reduce Drinking

Moderation Management is always thrilled to see articles that talk about how to reduce drinking vs. how to quit drinking as in Forbes.com’s recent article:  “16 Expert Tips For Reducing […]

Context and Craving Among Individuals With Alcohol Use Disorder Attempting to Moderate Their Drinking

Many individuals with alcohol use disorder (AUD) prefer a goal of moderation, because they do not see
their drinking as causing severe enough consequences to merit abstinence. Given that individuals
attempting to moderate will continue to put themselves in contexts where drinking occurs, understanding how distinct external alcohol cues prompt craving is important for implementing the optimal treatments for individuals with AUD.

Can Alcohol Use Disorder Recovery Include Some Heavy Drinking? A Replication and Extension up to 9 Years Following Treatment

Background: Recent research indicates some individuals who engage in heavy drinking following treatment for alcohol use disorder fare as well as those who abstain with respect to psychosocial functioning, employment, life satisfaction, and mental health. The current study evaluated whether these
findings replicated in an independent sample and examined associations between recovery profiles and functioning up to 6 years later.

What is Recovery?

Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is among the most prevalent psychiatric disorders and is associated with enormous public health costs. Although AUD and other addictive behaviors have been described as chronic relapsing conditions, most individuals who develop AUD will eventually recover.

Clinical Validation of Reduced Alcohol Consumption After Treatment for Alcohol Dependence Using theWorld Health Organization Risk Drinking Levels

Background: Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is a highly prevalent public health problem associated with considerable individual and societal costs. Abstinence from alcohol is the most widely accepted target of treatment for AUD, but it severely limits treatment options and could deter individuals who prefer to reduce their drinking from seeking treatment. Clinical validation of reduced alcohol consumption as the primary outcome of alcohol clinical trials is critical for expanding treatment options.